15th June 2015

Planning stages

Pre-application

An application for outline planning permission establishes the principle of development and as such detailed plans will not normally be required although this is largely dependent on the nature of the application. PersimmonTaylor Wimpey

Outline planning

An application for outline planning permission establishes the principle of development and as such detailed plans will not normally be required although this is largely dependent on the nature of the application.

It might be appropriate when an applicant is seeking an agreement “in principle” to a proposed development, without being committed to a particular form of design or layout.  The applicant can reserve some or all of the detailed matters of access, appearance, landscaping, layout and scale for later consideration.

Once outline permission has been granted, any developer will need to apply for approval of the outstanding details (reserved matters) before any work can start.

Bloor 2Hallam

Reserved matters

Approval of “reserved matters”, involves seeking permission for those aspects of access, appearance, landscaping, layout and scale that were not dealt with in the outline planning permission. Bloor 1

Full planning permission

A full planning application normally contains all the information and plans needed to enable the development, if approved, to go ahead. When full Planning Permission is given, it is common for planning conditions to be applied. A planning condition is a condition placed on grants of planning permission by Local Planning Authorities (North Somerset Council in our case). Planning permissions are usually granted subject to a planning condition which requires the development to be commenced within three years. Typically they may also include a number of other conditions, for example undertakings regarding environmental and noise issues; the scheme to be built in accordance with the approved drawings, trees to be planted as per the landscape scheme and replaced if they die in the first few years, or the colour and finish of external materials to be approved by the local authority. Some of these will need to be complied with before any work starts on site; others will take effect once the development is commenced, or later.
Planning conditions are imposed to require that something is done or not done by the developer in order to make the development acceptable. Sometimes, planning permission will only be granted subject to the applicant entering into a legal agreement under Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act requiring that certain things be done or money be paid to the Local Planning Authority to remedy an otherwise unacceptable impact arising from the development, e.g. to contribute towards the improvement of local highways serving the development before the development is completed or occupied.

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